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2009 ILLINOIS OPEN  
All Available USCF Increment Rules

5F1. Standard timer for increment. An increment clock (a clock with added time capabilities) is the standard timer. a. The increment clock is set to add time for each move, called an increment. The standard increment is 30 seconds per move. For quick chess the standard increment is 10 seconds per move. A game with an increment time control should be set with the increment in effect from move one, even if the time control is mixed. (e.g. 40/90, SD/30, Inc/30) A game started without an increment capable clock should remain the timer for the game.

 

TD Tip: Increment mode, added time, and Fischer modes are equivalent. b. If an increment clock or a similar clock is not available, 5F applies and the increment time may be applied as a delay. c. If an increment clock is not available, and the only delay clock available cannot be set to the equivalent delay time, then the delay clock may be set to the maximum allowable delay time (for the clock) not to exceed the increment time.

 

Variant: Total time may be adjusted to compensate for increment time lost.

 

TD tip (variant): Suggested time adjustment is one minute for each second of increment or delay time lost. d. If neither an increment capable clock, not a delay capable digital clock (e.g. analog clock), then the game may be played without increment or delay, and follow the time control rules (regular or sudden death) as appropriate.

 

Variant: Total time may be adjusted to compensate for increment.

 

TD tip (variant): Suggested adjusted time is one minute for each second of increment.

 

11C. Accidental piece displacement. … TD tip: If using increment time control it may not be to a player’s advantage to start the opponent’s clock if the opponent created an illegal position or accidentally displaced pieces. In that case the players may stop or pause the clock until the correct position is reinstated.

 

14G Both flags down in sudden death. …

 

TD tip: An increment time control of 30 seconds or more is not considered sudden death, therefore 14G does not apply.

 

14H1. Explanation. This procedure is not available for which a clock is being used with time delay or increment, …

 

14K Claim of Insufficient Losing Chances does not apply in increment games.

TD TIP: Only players in games with increment time controls of 30 seconds or more and using properly set increment capable clocks are required to keep score at all times, even in the last five minutes of any time control period. Players using improperly set increment clocks or non-increment capable clocks, even those clocks adjusted for an increment time control, are regulated by rule 15B.

 

15C. Scorekeeping in time pressure, sudden death time control. If Either Player has less than five minutes remaining in a sudden death time control and does not have additional time (increment) of 30 seconds or more added with each move, both players are excused from the obligation to keep score….

 

TD TIP: Only players in games with increment time controls of 30 seconds or more and using properly set increment capable clocks are required to keep score at all times, even in the last five minutes of any time control period. Players using improperly set increment clocks or non-increment capable clocks, even those clocks adjusted for an increment time control, are regulated by rule 15C.

 

16Bb. Delay or increment: Time delay or increment clocks should be set… to their opponents. The time delay or increment should be set according to the director’s instructions, with the time delay or increment in force starting at move one (5Fb). Clocks equipped to do so should be set for a Bronstein or a delay mode for delay controls or for Fischer, added time, or increment mode for increment controls.

 

TD TIP: Directors are not expected to know how to set delay or increment clocks (5F) but… TD TIP: Some players due to incapacity or due to religious reasons cannot use some types of clock such as electric, electronic or with digital displays. After a director…

 

16T Both players exceed time control TD Tip: An increment time control of 30 seconds or more is not considered sudden death, therefore if both players should exceed time control, the clocks should be reset the “next” time control of the time increment (e.g. 30 seconds) per move

 

42E. Increment clock preferable in increment time controls. A properly set clock with time increment capability is preferable to any other clock in a game stipulating increment time controls. Therefore, if White has such a clock available and black does not, white’s clock should be used. The only occasion where black retains the right to use the clock of their choice, is if both players have an increment clock or if white is late for the game and the game is started, and black has already set up the equipment. In any particular game, if the digital clock cannot be properly set, then the opponent of the player providing the clock may choose which legal clock is to be used. Order of standard clock preference is given in 5F1.

 

42E1 Recommended function of an increment clock. a. The display at all times should show the time available to complete a player’s next move. (I.e. time added at the completion of a move. b. In case of passing a time control, a sign on the display must give clear signal time has expired. c. In case of accumulative or delay timing systems, the clock should not add any additional time if a player passed the last time control.

 

TD tip: Some clocks add time at the beginning of the move, hence when a player is not on the move, the total time for the next move is the time displayed plus the increment. Technically this is no different than adding time at the beginning of a move, except that the total time for the next move is that which is displayed plus the increment. Either function is considered standard, and are, in fact equivalent. If unsure, ask your opponent when the time is added, and observe that function early in the game when the clock is in use. Time expires when the clock reaches 0:00. Most clocks freeze time (do not add the increment) of a player who has expired (always reads 0:00, but continue to run for the player who does not.) This is considered standard. In this case, it is not possible for a player to “unflag”, but it is possible for both players to run out of time. See also 16T. Both players exceed time control. Clocks that do not freeze time (run negative time or pause at zero), continue to run and adds back the increment at the completion of a move are still considered preferable to a clock that does not have increment capability. This function should be explained to an opponent prior to the game, and claims of expired time should be made in accordance with 13C. In this case, a claim may still be made after the player whose time has expired has completed a move (time added) if the displayed time is equal to or less than the increment. Such a claim (in accordance with 13C5) must be made before the claimant has completed the next move. It is possible, with the next or subsequent moves that the displayed time is greater than the increment without a claim being made. In this case there is no evidence that time has expired, and therefore a player may have “unflagged”. With this type of clock function, you lose your right to claim the win on time if you complete your next move and your opponent’s clock now show positive time with his own clock running.